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Building a Better Knowledge Management

January 6th, 2015

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Long before Google Glass wearers made the news (and became pariahs within San Francisco-area coffee houses and restaurants), research projects at huge companies like IBM and Microsoft sought to bridge the gap between the capture and storage of corporate knowledge and intellectual property, and the difficult-to-archive individual narrative that attempted to make sense of this important, yet mostly disconnected content.

The effort of transcribing a personal experience or individual learning in context to our projects, business initiatives and other corporate artifacts (e.g., presentations, documents, spreadsheets) is incredibly difficult to accomplish in a way that can then be utilized by our knowledge management systems.

The problem with knowledge management (KM) is not a matter of data infrastructure — whether your data resides on premises, in servers that you manage versus out in the cloud is irrelevant (to some degree) to the argument — but with a user experience that fails to align the needs of the complex, non-linear playback mechanisms of the human brain with our systems of record.