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Using Web Components in WordPress is Easier Than You Think

August 12th, 2021

Now that we’ve seen that web components and interactive web components are both easier than you think, let’s take a look at adding them to a content management system, namely WordPress. There are three major ways we can add them. First, through manual input into the site—putting them directly into widgets or text blocks, basically…

Dynamic Favicons for WordPress

May 28th, 2021

Typically, a single favicon is used across a whole domain. But there are times you wanna step it up with different favicons depending on context. A website might change the favicon to match the content being viewed. Or a site might allow users to personalize their theme colors, and those preferences are reflected in the…

Using New Gatsby Source WordPress Plugin

April 23rd, 2021

The WPGraphQL plugin can be used to create a site that uses WordPress for content management, but with a front-end, that’s driven by Gatsby. We call this a “decoupled” or “headless” CMS because the site’s back-end and front-end are separate entities that still talk to one another via APIs where components on the front end…

Headless Form Submission With the WordPress REST API

April 9th, 2021

If you’re building a WordPress site, you need a good reason not to choose a WordPress form plugin. They are convenient and offer plenty of customizations that would take a ton of effort to build from scratch. They render the HTML, validate the data, store the submissions, and provide integration with third-party services. But suppose…

WordPress Caching: All You Need To Know

April 1st, 2021

Here’s Ashley Rich at Delicious Brains writing about all the layers of caching that are relevant to a WordPress site. I think we all know that caching is complicated, but jeez, it’s a journey to understand all the caches at work here. The point of cache being speed and reducing the burden on the worst…

Platform News: Defaulting to Logical CSS, Fugu APIs, Custom Media Queries, and WordPress vs. Italics

March 12th, 2021

Looks like 2021 is the time to start using CSS Logical Properties! Plus, Chrome recently shipped a few APIs that have raised eyebrows, SVG allows us to disable its aspect ratio, WordPress focuses on the accessibility of its typography, and there’s still no update (or progress) on the development of CSS custom media queries. Let’s…

Rendering the WordPress philosophy in GraphQL

January 18th, 2021

WordPress is a CMS that’s coded in PHP. But, even though PHP is the foundation, WordPress also holds a philosophy where user needs are prioritized over developer convenience. That philosophy establishes an implicit contract between the developers building WordPress themes and plugins, and the user managing a WordPress site. GraphQL is an interface that retrieves…

My WordPress Comments Wishlist

November 11th, 2020

A built-in commenting system is one of the reasons people reach for WordPress (and often stay there long-term). While I do think having a comment system is compelling (and as big of a fan of building on WordPress as I am), I find the comments system on WordPress quite crusty. It needs some love! There…

Getting the WordPress Block Editor to Look Like the Front End Design

November 4th, 2020

I’m a WordPress user and, if you’re anything like me, you always have two tabs open when you edit a post: one with the new fancy pants block editor, aka Gutenberg, and another with a preview of the post so you know it won’t look wonky on the front end. It’s no surprise that a…

WordPress and Jamstack

October 26th, 2020

I recently moderated a panel at Netlify’s virtual Jamstack Conf that included Netlify CEO Matt Biilman and Automattic founder Matt Mullenweg. The whole thing was built up — at least to some — as a “Jamstack vs. WordPress” showdown. I have lots of thoughts of my own on this and think I’m more useful as…